Posted by & filed under Alexandrite, Award Winning, Color, Craftsmanship, Duet Collection, Events, News, Omi Privé, One-of-a-Kind Collection, Spinel, Trends.

Omi Privé recently won two AGTA Spectrum Awards, a jewelry design competition that has been held annually for over 30 years.  What does winning a design competition mean for the designer, and the consumer who might be considering buying a winning piece?  There are many factors that go into the value of the award for all involved.

Let’s look at the Spectrum Awards specifically, which is considered one of the most prestigious design competitions in the world  This competition is produced annually by the American Gem Trade Association (AGTA), a trade association who’s mission is to promote colored gemstones.  The competition provides value for the association by encouraging jewelry designers to use colored gemstones in their designs, hopefully purchased from AGTA gemstone dealers.  What helps set the Spectrum Awards apart is that each piece of jewelry is physically judged by a panel of jewelry industry experts that changes each year, ensuring that not one form of design is ever favored over another and that the smallest of details can affect the final outcome.  To win a Spectrum Award is a benchmark that many designers aspire to achieve.

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2016 AGTA Spectrum Award winning Spinel ring

Many gem dealers and designers collaborate on individual pieces to take advantage of the opportunity for exposure for individual gemstones and design aesthetics.  Each year the competition receives between 500 and 600 entries.  Each entrant knows that they are going to be competing against the best jewelry designers in the US and Canada, so everyone tends to put their best foot forward and sends in their best work.  As the judges work their way through each of the entries, they must consider the quality of the gemstones, the quality of the workmanship and the design aesthetic.  It usually takes two days of judging to determine the winning entries.  Winners are announced the following day and the media are invited to see all the winners and other entries.  The media values the competition because it offers a rare opportunity to look for new trends and emerging designers all in one location.

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2016 AGTA Spectrum Award winning Alexandrite ring

designed in collaboration with Remy Rotenier

Winning designers benefit from an incredible amount of exposure driven by AGTA’s public relations efforts to share the results of the competition.  AGTA and the media feature the winning designs throughout the year until the following year’s competition. The designers themselves publicize their wins through traditional marketing channels and social media.  Yet, the true value for the designer who wins is that their work stood out against some of the top designers in the world.  If they are a new designer, this exposure can serve as a launching point for their collection.  For an established designer, a win reinforces their standing and provides additional caché for their jewelry lines.

For the pieces that win, many are sold quickly to collectors of those designers.  For a client to be able to own an actual award-winning design gives them another opportunity to talk about the jewelry they love.  Other designers hold on to their winning pieces and feature them in shows and museums.  Many designs are incorporated into the designer’s collections in a bigger way to take advantage of the exposure and potential trends developing as a result of their win.  We love to see our pieces being worn and enjoyed by our clients, so our award-winning designs are made available to our collectors.  The awards are a welcome recognition for the quality of work we do, but in the end, it is all about these pieces adorning the people who appreciate their beauty.

 

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Posted by & filed under Award Winning, Bridal, Color, Fancy Sapphire, Omi Privé, One-of-a-Kind Collection, Sapphire.

Sapphire is one of the most revered gemstones in the world.  It has held special meaning from the most ancient of times when it was worn as a symbol of power, wealth and as protection from harm and witchcraft.  It is even said that the Ten Comandments were given to Moses on tablets of sapphire.  As sapphires made their way into more modern pieces of jewelry, their siginificance and value continued to rise.  Sapphires are found in the world’s most important royal jewelry pieces – so much so that sapphire is considered a “royal” gem. One royal-related piece that has garnered incredible attention in recent years is the blue sapphire engagement ring that Prince Charles gave to Diana, and subsequently that Prince William gave to Kate Middleton.

 

 

Sapphire is probably best known as a blue gemstone, but it is found in every color of the spectrum.  When a sapphire is red, it is called a ruby.  This wide palette of colors gives jewelry designers a lot of flexibility in creating colorful, all-sapphire designs.  Sapphires are an excellent gemstone to use in everyday jewelry because of its durability – as it is the second hardest gemstone behind only diamond.  A recent trend, maybe with help from Will and Kate, has seen many couples choosing sapphires for their engagement rings over diamonds – either in the traditional blue sapphire with a diamond halo, or in other colors as in the purple and pink sapphire ring below.  Sapphires durability makes it suitable for everyday wear.

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Would you say “Yes” to this engagement ring?

 

Sapphires are found in many countries around the world, including the United States.  Most of our sapphires come from Sri Lanka/Ceylon, Madagascar and Myanmar/Burma.  In most of these places sapphires are still mined by hand by artisanal miners in very remote areas.  We travel the globe to find sapphires that best meet our strict standards and our clients’ needs.  Fine sapphires are rare and prices have risen steadily for many years as demand continues to be very strong, which makes fine sapphire a nice long term investment.  There is nothing more fulfilling for us than sourcing a gorgeous sapphire, designing a beautiful jewelry piece around it, then having someone appreciate it enough to add it to their personal jewelry collection.

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Award-winning Omi Prive’ sapphire and diamond platinum bracelet

Posted by & filed under Color, Gem History, Gem Knowledge, Omi Privé.

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While we are all in the throws of Olympic Fever (no, not the type you catch when swimming in Rio Bay!) – we thought it might be fun to explore the meaning behind the colors in the Olympic rings on the official flag.  We here at Omi Gems and Omi Privé are hyper-focused on color.

 

The multi-color interlocking rings symbol that we all associate with the Olympic Games was designed in 1912 by one of the co-founders of the modern Olympics, Baron Pierre de Coubertin.  His inspiration stemmed from the interlocking rings of Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung, who thought the ring symbolized continuity and the human being.

 

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The five rings symbolize the five populated continents at the time: Africa, America, Asia, Europe and Oceania.  The ring colors, contrary to belief at one point, are not assigned to specific continents. The colors (including white) represented all of the colors on all of the nation’s flags who competed in the Olypics at that time.  Coubertin shared the following in 1912:

“…the six colorscombined in this way reproduce the colors of every country without exception.  The blue and yellow of Sweden, the blue and white of Greece, the tri-colors of France and Serbia, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, America, Germany, Belgium, Italy, and Hungary, and the yellow and red of Spain, are placed together with the innovations of Brazil or Australia, with old Japan, and with new China.  Here is truly an international symbol.”  (Olympique magazine)

So, enjoy the rest of the Olympic Games and it’s symbolism.  We all can use a little dose of the Olympic ideal of bringing the world together to celebrate sport and life.

Posted by & filed under Award Winning, Gem History, Gem Knowledge, Omi Privé, Spinel.

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For more than a century, August babies have had to embrace peridot and sardonyx (a reddish-brown quartz) as their official birthstones.  Peridot is a polarizing gemstone – many people like the yellow-green hued gem, but many do not.  But fashionable people born in the eighth month can rejoice in the streets as they now have a great additional option – the spectacular spinel.

 

The American Gem Trade Association and Jewelers of America recently announced their decision to add spinel to the official birthstone list for August.  This is only the third update to the list that was created in 1912.  The last addition took place in 2002, when tanzanite was added as a birthstone for December.

 

Spinel is a gemstone that deserves more exposure and recognition.  For centuries, red spinels were mistaken for rubies and it wasn’t until more modern testing techniques were developed that the difference was identified.  In fact, one of the most prominent “rubies”, the Black Prince Ruby in the Imperial State Crown in the British Crown Jewels, is actually a 170 carat red spinel.  While a deep, vivid red is the most valuable color of spinel, the gem naturally occurs in a spectrum of colors including pink, blue, purple, yellow, black and green hues.

 

Spinels are often called the “Gemologist’s Gemstone” because of their fabulous properties, including single refractivity and octahedral crystal structure.  Unlike many gemstones, spinels are almost never treated in any way to enhance their color or clarity.  Cutters are able to release the color and life of these natural gems by faceting the rough crystals into a multitude of shapes.

 

Omi Privé has featured spinels in many of its pieces over the years and will continue to do so in upcoming collections.  Niveet is passionate about sourcing beautiful spinels, then designing  jewelry around them with complementary colors.  Just recently, one of our finest spinel pieces was recognized with a prestigious AGTA Spectrum Award – which honors jewelry design, craftsmanship and gemstone quality.

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Posted by & filed under Color.

Pantone Quote re Color of the YearFor the first time ever, Pantone selected two colors as its color of the year for 2016. The first color is Rose Quartz, a warm, soft pink with a very earthy undertone. The second color, Serenity, is a lilac-tinged blue with the same earthy quality, which leans on its purplish influence to blend seamlessly into the Rose Quartz.

Pantone sees these selections as peaceful, soothing colors for our modern times. This has both practical and psychological implications. From a psychological perspective, Pantone writes “as consumers seek mindfulness as an antidote to modern day stresses, welcoming colors that psychologically fulfill our yearning for reassurance and security are becoming more prominent.” More practically speaking, “in many parts of the world we are experiencing a gender blur as it relates to fashion, which has in turn impacted color trends throughout all other areas of design. The more unilateral approach to color is coinciding with societal movements toward gender equality and fluidity, the consumer’s increased comfort with using color as a form of expression, a generation that has less concern about being typecast or judged and an open exchange of digital information that has opened our eyes to different approaches for color usage.”

Many of our Omi Privé designs use gemstones that match Pantone’s Rose Quartz and Serenity palette. We see some of the same things Pantone mentions about these colors when showing our gems to potential buyers. When looking at the softer blue sapphires, it’s not unusual to hear someone say, “that’s like staring into a pond,” or “that’s like stepping into a cool pool of water.” Coming closest to the pink in Pantone’s Rose Quartz, padparadscha sapphires offer that earthy pink tone that often leads to a sharp intake of breath, followed by a comment like “I could just stare at that forever.”

Here are a few images of Omi Privé jewelry that pay homage to Pantone’s 2016 Color of the Year.

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted by & filed under Gem Knowledge, Sapphire.

Rosecut Fancy SapphiresIt’s hard to find anyone who doesn’t love sapphires, because there are so many wonderful sapphires to choose from! We thought it might be a fun time to review the different types of sapphires and perhaps add a bit of sapphire trivia to your conversational repertoire.

Blue sapphires are the most well-known and also the most popular. Most people picture rich, blueberry-blue gems when they hear or read the word sapphire. Blue sapphires are found all over the world, including Kashmir, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Australia, Madagascar, Tanzania and even the state of Montana! Sapphires have been used for nearly a millennium in the adornment of clergy and royalty, and of course Princess Diana received a magnificent sapphire engagement ring from Britain’s Prince Charles.

Pink sapphires have gained tremendous popularity since new deposits were found in Madagascar in the late 1990s. Until then, they were extremely rare. Even now they are fairly rare — particularly larger pink sapphires. As a result, stones half a carat or more are not cut into calibrated sizes. Instead, they are generally cut to retain as much of the rough as possible, and the result is that most pink sapphires of any size are also highly unique in terms of cut.

Yellow sapphires are often confused with fancy yellow diamonds. They show up in a very broad range of color from greenish yellow to orangey-yellow, and the most favored is saturated, vibrant, canary yellow. Because yellow sapphires tend to have fewer inclusions (seen as shaded or dark spots) than other colors of sapphire, you’ll often hear gem dealers speak of “clarity” when discussing yellow sapphires, but not when speaking of blues or pinks. And since yellow sapphires are more abundant than pink sapphires, cutters worry less about retaining the size of the gemstones. As a result, it’s very easy to find consistent, calibrated yellow sapphires.

Padparadscha Sapphires live in the color range between pink and orange. The term padparadscha itself is derived from the word for an aquatic lotus blossom, which, not surprisingly, has a salmon-y color. Interestingly, gemologists and collectors cannot agree on exactly what salmon color range defines a padparadscha sapphire. There is still some argument about how much orange, how much pink, how dark, how light . . . and we imagine this will go on for a while. But when a sapphire falls clearly in that salmon range, it leaves little room for debate and a premium is typically added to the price.  Omi has a long history working with Padparadscha sapphires, and they have graced many beautiful designs.

Star sapphires occur in nearly every color from transparent to green. The star occurs when small, needle-like inclusions of the mineral rutile are embedded in the sapphires, which create a light effect called asterism. In black star sapphires, the mineral inclusions are hematite instead of rutile.

The ideal star sapphire has a star that starts – and is centered on – the crown of the sapphire, with bright, clear rays that reach down to the base evenly and without interruption. As you might imagine, proper cutting is critical to preserve and showcase a natural star sapphire!

And now, let’s talk about rubies. Both rubies and sapphires are members of the mineral species corundum. A red corundum becomes a ruby – instead of a pink sapphire – when it displays a medium to very dark red tone. Rubies are found in many locales around the world, but the most desired source is Myanmar. You’ve probably heard of “Burmese Rubies,” and of course Burma is the name Myanmar was previously known by. Burmese rubies, known for their “pigeon’s blood” color, can be priced 30-40% higher than rubies from other sources.  Rubies are typically faceted, but star rubies (remember – star sapphires occur in every color!) are almost always cabochons.

What other colors do sapphires come in? Lime green, dark green (very rare), magenta, transparent, orange, brown, gray, black, violet, and lavender are all colors of sapphire. Many purple and violet sapphires shift color in different lights, appearing violet in fluorescent or daylight and deeply purple under incandescent light.

We could write an entire book on sapphires (and some have), but hopefully this overview helps you develop your love for sapphires, and understand a bit more about the many types of sapphires we use at Omi Privé.

Posted by & filed under Trends.

marsalapairing1Gone are the days when women waited around for a parent, fiancé or spouse to buy them jewelry. Today, according to research done by Mintel in 2015, 30% of women report buying themselves non-diamond jewelry* as a treat or even for no special reason, 19% of women report buying themselves non-diamond jewelry as a birthday gift, and 20% of women report buying themselves non-diamond jewelry as a holiday gift or for some other special event or occasion. Another 7% of women actually buy their own anniversary gifts! All that adds up to a lot of women buying jewelry for themselves these days!

Jewelry is an incredibly personal purchase. We all have different tastes, respond to different stories, and are concerned about different features. At Omi Privé, we don’t get too hung up on “selling” jewelry. Sure, all businesses need to sell, so that’s certainly something we do. But we spend far more time thinking about the design of our jewelry, the characteristics of the gemstones we select for each piece, the places those gems were found and mined, and the stories that surround these very precious gems. We know that when women go looking for something special, they know it when they see it, and they want to learn more about it. So instead of “selling,” we get to engage in conversations about natural beauty, design, and extraordinary craftsmanship. And that’s why we love our work!

* Jewelry in which diamonds are not the primary gem material, including primarily metal jewelry.

Posted by & filed under Gem Knowledge.

rough alexandrite from omi gemsPerhaps you’ve noticed how often we use the word mineral when writing about gemstones. Given the importance of minerals to our life’s work – and your jewelry viewing and wearing pleasure – we thought it might be interesting to take a moment to explore what minerals are.

First, a few Myth Busters

Most people over the age of 45 or 50 think about minerals according the designations they learned in second grade, when they were taught that all things can be assigned to the animal, vegetable, or mineral kingdoms. This is an archaic use of the term, and younger generations may have heard this information from their parents, but are no longer taught that the world can be broken down into three kingdoms.

The word mineral is also misused in geology, where anything that is obtained from the ground for use by man is called a mineral. Coal, oil, gas, granite, and obsidian are often referred to as minerals because they are mined from the ground, but for various reasons are not minerals at all.

So what is a Mineral?

The scientific definition of a mineral is something that is:

  • Naturally occurring (people did not make it).
  • Inorganic (is not made by an organism, but instead, created in the earth).
  • Solid (not liquid or gas at standard room temperature).
  • Is made of narrowly defined chemical ingredients (for example, Corundum’s chemistry is expressed as AI2O3, which means it is made of 2 aluminum atoms and 3 oxygen atoms, whereas rocks are comprised of a mixture of minerals with a much broader chemical definition).
  • Exhibits an ordered internal structure (the atoms are arranged in a systematic and repeating pattern).

There are approximately 4,000 known minerals. Many of these minerals are essential for plants to grow, are required for healthy bodies, and are used to make medicines. Minerals are also used to make the clothing we wear, the houses we live in, the cars we drive, and the roads we drive on. In fact, it is estimated that three trillion tons of mineral commodities are used to support the standard of living in the United States each year!

Are all Gemstones Minerals?

Actually, no. Amber is solidified tree resin and other fossilized organic matter, so it is not a mineral. Opal is actually a hydrated form of silica without a clearly defined shape or form, so it cannot be a mineral. Pearls are not minerals because they are formed by a living organism, and they do not have a distinctive crystal structure. Of course, anything that is created in a laboratory or made with synthetics is not a mineral, though minerals are probably part of the materials they are made of.

Thank Goodness for Minerals!

Minerals are not only essential to sustain life on this planet; the majority of gems are also minerals. Rubies, garnets, sapphires, emerald, aquamarine, citrine — all are minerals that can be cut, shaped and polished. So not only do minerals feed us, clothe us, provide beautiful landscapes and functional buildings; they are also responsible for giving us the incredibly beautiful gems we view in museums, collect in pouches and drawers, and wear as adornment in jewelry. No wonder so many of us naturally gravitate to the splendor of natural colored gemstones! They truly are the stuff of life.

Posted by & filed under Gem History, Sapphire.

Star of India SapphirePaola de Luca’s Trend Book 2017 is a treasure trove of predictions about emerging consumer needs and tastes in jewelry. One of the predictions we find most interesting is that consumers want jewelry with historical references. We’ve seen indications of this trend as well.

In the larger jewelry world, this trend may show up as an interest in coin jewelry, crown rings, and reliefs of historical monuments and art. In the colored gemstone world, history is rich with stories of royal jewels, dramatic love stories, grand thefts, and even battles.

At Omi Privé we’re not just gem nerds, we love our history too. One story that never loses its luster is the story of the Star of India, a 563-carat star sapphire that is believed to be over a billion years old. It is the size of a golf ball, nearly flawless, and it has stars on both sides of the gemstone — all of which are highly unusual.

It was originally purchased by esteemed mineralogist and collector George Frederick Kunz (1856 – 1932) on behalf of Tiffany & Co. It was part of a collection Kunz had convinced his bosses at Tiffany to build in order to gain more respect from European gem and jewelry collectors, and which was ultimately purchased by J.P. Morgan and donated to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Unfortunately, nothing is known about the history of the Star of India prior to its purchase in Sri Lanka in the late 1800s. Kunz himself wrote in 1913 that the Star of India “has a more or less indefinite historic record of some three centuries,” which indicates that it was mined in the 1600s; but even that may be speculation.

So the story of the Star of India begins with a mystery. Now let’s add some action. On October 29, 1964, two amateur thieves scaled a fence into the American Museum of Natural History’s courtyard, climbed a fire escape, and hung a rope from a pillar set over the 4th floor windows of the J.P. Morgan Hall of Gems and Minerals. Inside that Hall, the Star of India was on display. Hanging from the rope, one of the thieves swung to a window that was cracked open, and used his feet to open the window the rest of the way.

Using a glass cutter, some duct tape, and a squeegee, they stole 24 gems – including the Star of India. Then the thieves, Allan Dale Kuhn and Jack Roland Murphy, retraced their steps, grabbed separate taxis, and rode off with their valuable loot.

In the six months that followed, the Star of India led state and federal police on a wild goose chase involving anonymous foreign collectors, an upper West Side party palace, handsome bad boys, jilted lovers, suicide, a red Cadillac, an underwater hiding place, disguising one of the thieves as a police officer to spirit him off to Miami, and the pistol-whipping of Eva Gabor.

How’s that for a bit of history? We bet you’ll never look at a star sapphire the same way again.

Posted by & filed under Bridal, Ruby, Sapphire.

Omi Privee ring with Kashmiri sapphireThough diamonds are currently the gem of choice in engagement rings, it was only in the 20th century that diamonds became popular. Before the 20th century, colored gemstones had a long history of being considered most precious.

Engagement rings as we know them began as a result of Pope Innocent III implementing a mandatory waiting period between engagement and marriage in the year 1215. Until that time, people simply married once they made the decision to do so. Couples in the limbo between not-married and married began to exchange symbols of commitment, and the engagement ring was born. Jump forward 150-200 years, and it was the sapphire that was the favorite engagement gemstone, because it symbolized love, truth and commitment. Plus, it was believed that a sapphire’s color would fade if worn by an unfaithful or untruthful person!

Royalty were known to use diamonds in their engagement rings, but no more often than they used sapphires, rubies and emeralds. And of course, back in those centuries diamonds were extremely rare. But starting in 1870, when huge diamond deposits were discovered in South Africa, diamonds began to flood the market and prices for diamonds started to come down. De Beers launched its massive effort in to make diamonds part of every wedding in 1938.  They coined the phrase “A Diamond is Forever” in 1947 and by the 1960s, diamonds were synonymous with engagement.  That slogan was named the best advertising slogan of the 20th century.

Today we see a resurgence of interest in colored gemstones for engagement rings. Today’s brides are open to a broad range of gemstones and designs, basing their jewelry decisions on personal taste, the desire for uniqueness, and concerns about diamond origins. Colored gemstones – many of which are rarer than diamonds – offer exciting stories for today’s brides; from historic lore to the metaphysical properties of gems and the various meanings associated with colors. It appears the old adage is true: What comes around goes around. At Omi Privé, we’re just excited that colored gemstone bridal jewelry has come around again.