Pantone’s Spring Palette 2017

Posted by & filed under Aquamarine, Bridal, Color, Craftsmanship, Doré Collection, Duet Collection, Fancy Sapphire, Gem History, Gem Knowledge, Monaco Collection, News, Omi Privé, One-of-a-Kind Collection, Padparadscha Sapphire, Sapphire, Sevilla Collection, Signature Collection, Spessartite Garnet, Spinel, Tourmaline, Trends.

Accessorizing with the Colors of the Season

 

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The trend-setting institution that is Pantone shares with the world on an ongoing basis the most important fashion colors for Spring and Fall seasons.  What do you do with this information?  Do you immediately go out shopping, with palette in hand, to ensure you are on trend with your personal apparel?  Or do you give it a quick glance, pick out a couple of your favorites and file it away for future reference?  The important aspect from our perspective of this guide to the upcoming season’s colors is how do we recommend our jewelry as an accessory to outifts in these hues.

 

For example, let’s look at what we might suggest for Island Paradise, a light, refreshing blue color.  The obvious choice if you were the type of person who likes matching accessories, would be something with aquamarine as the featured gemstone.  The light, airy feel of aqua would pair beautifully with this color.  What about a complementary color?  We would suggest something with a pastel feel, such as a light pink or peach.  A piece featuring a light pink sapphire, spinel, morganite, or in this case a Padparadscha sapphire, would be a great match.

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If we look at the more “earthy” colors in this palette, aside from finding matching colors, we will also have the opportunity to select colors that really pop against a warmer base color.  If we look at the the color Greenery, which is also Pantone’s “Color of the Year” for 2017, we would match this color with gemstones such as peridot, chrysoberyl or green tourmaline, like this ring below.  On the other side of the spectrum, you would look to something in a bolder purple, red or pink as a suitable companion.  As you can see from this Duet ring, we love combining green with purple spinel centers.

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For another example, let’s consider a rich blue color like Lapis Blue.  One of our specialties is blue sapphire, so matching this color with existing Omi jewelry is relatively easy.  The complementary color for a bold blue color like this would be an equally bold orange hue – which we would find in our new orange tourmaline ring seen below.  We can also find similar colors in spessartite garnets and orange sapphires.

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There is a myriad of options when it comes to accessorizing this Spring’s fashion color palette with fabulous colored gemstones.  Knowing and understanding how colors accent each other will go a long way in developing your fashion credibility amongst your peers and clients.  Pay attention to what the trends are and take the time to pick out the best options for you to ensure you are trend-savvy in your day-to-day life.

 

 

Omi Privé Holiday Gift Guide

Posted by & filed under Alexandrite, Color, Craftsmanship, Custom Collection, Duet Collection, Fancy Sapphire, Gem History, Gem Knowledge, Kunzite, Omi Privé, One-of-a-Kind Collection, Opal, Ruby, Sapphire, Trends.

A little holiday season inspiration for that special someone……..

 

What do you buy for that certain someone who has everything?  Well, we at Omi Privé specialize in the rare and extraordinary, so here are a few of our suggestions for this year:

 

Incredible Australian Lightning Ridge Opal Ring

An amazing palette of color swirls around in this 13.46 carat opal.  We surround this magnificent gem with grass-green tsavorite garnets, deep ocean blue sapphires and diamonds – all set in platinum.  No two opals are alike and very few look anything like this one.
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Pastel Pinks, Purples and Blues in a Cacophony of Color

In this design collaboration with artist/designer Remy Rotenier, we started with an amazing 12.27 carat cushion-cut pink kunzite in the center then surrounded it with rose cut sapphires in pleasing pink and purple tones.  We added in a few pretty blue sapphires as accents to round out this18K rose gold ring for the free form loving artist in us all.

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Luck be a Sapphire Tonight!

If you know someone who needs a little good fortune – how about this 7.77 carat emerald cut blue sapphire from Ceylon set in platinum and surrounded by baguette diamonds and a pair of blue sapphires?  Imagine looking at this beauty everytime you pull down the handle on a one-armed bandit.

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You Can’t Buy Me Love

But, you can buy this fabulous ring……featuring a passion-inspiring, unheated 4.01 carat oval ruby from Mozambique and over a carat of diamonds set in platinum with 18K gold prongs.  This is truly one of Mother Nature’s true works of art, released by the hands of a master gem cutter.

 

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Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star

Thanks to an effect known as asterism, certain cabochon-cut sapphires exhibit a star-like pattern when light is reflected off the internal silk of the gem.  Finding a fine quality sapphire that exhibits this is rare, finding a pair is much rarer.  Check out these star sapphire earrings, accented with blue sapphires and diamonds in 18K white gold.  These are sure to be a conversation-starter at any event.

 

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Emerald by Day, Ruby by Night – Introducing the Alexandrite

A lot of history and lore surrounds the magical color-change gemstone Alexandrite.  What is truly factual is the beauty and rarity of this very fine gemstone.  This 3.76 carat emerald-cut Alexandrite exhibits a deep teal blue-green in daylight and a rich raspberry-purple color in warm candlelight.  The gem originated in the exceptional chrysoberyl deposits of Brazil, which have all been played out at this time.  The gemstone is framed by a halo of diamonds, then framed again with more alexandrites that change color along with the center when the lighting conditions change.  The platinum ring shank features more alexandrites and diamonds – this is a true work of gem wizardry.

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We hope you all have a wonderful holiday season, and remember that the more you give, the more you get!

 

 

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The Value of Award-Winning Design

Posted by & filed under Alexandrite, Award Winning, Color, Craftsmanship, Duet Collection, Events, News, Omi Privé, One-of-a-Kind Collection, Spinel, Trends.

Omi Privé recently won two AGTA Spectrum Awards, a jewelry design competition that has been held annually for over 30 years.  What does winning a design competition mean for the designer, and the consumer who might be considering buying a winning piece?  There are many factors that go into the value of the award for all involved.

Let’s look at the Spectrum Awards specifically, which is considered one of the most prestigious design competitions in the world  This competition is produced annually by the American Gem Trade Association (AGTA), a trade association who’s mission is to promote colored gemstones.  The competition provides value for the association by encouraging jewelry designers to use colored gemstones in their designs, hopefully purchased from AGTA gemstone dealers.  What helps set the Spectrum Awards apart is that each piece of jewelry is physically judged by a panel of jewelry industry experts that changes each year, ensuring that not one form of design is ever favored over another and that the smallest of details can affect the final outcome.  To win a Spectrum Award is a benchmark that many designers aspire to achieve.

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2016 AGTA Spectrum Award winning Spinel ring

Many gem dealers and designers collaborate on individual pieces to take advantage of the opportunity for exposure for individual gemstones and design aesthetics.  Each year the competition receives between 500 and 600 entries.  Each entrant knows that they are going to be competing against the best jewelry designers in the US and Canada, so everyone tends to put their best foot forward and sends in their best work.  As the judges work their way through each of the entries, they must consider the quality of the gemstones, the quality of the workmanship and the design aesthetic.  It usually takes two days of judging to determine the winning entries.  Winners are announced the following day and the media are invited to see all the winners and other entries.  The media values the competition because it offers a rare opportunity to look for new trends and emerging designers all in one location.

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2016 AGTA Spectrum Award winning Alexandrite ring

designed in collaboration with Remy Rotenier

Winning designers benefit from an incredible amount of exposure driven by AGTA’s public relations efforts to share the results of the competition.  AGTA and the media feature the winning designs throughout the year until the following year’s competition. The designers themselves publicize their wins through traditional marketing channels and social media.  Yet, the true value for the designer who wins is that their work stood out against some of the top designers in the world.  If they are a new designer, this exposure can serve as a launching point for their collection.  For an established designer, a win reinforces their standing and provides additional caché for their jewelry lines.

For the pieces that win, many are sold quickly to collectors of those designers.  For a client to be able to own an actual award-winning design gives them another opportunity to talk about the jewelry they love.  Other designers hold on to their winning pieces and feature them in shows and museums.  Many designs are incorporated into the designer’s collections in a bigger way to take advantage of the exposure and potential trends developing as a result of their win.  We love to see our pieces being worn and enjoyed by our clients, so our award-winning designs are made available to our collectors.  The awards are a welcome recognition for the quality of work we do, but in the end, it is all about these pieces adorning the people who appreciate their beauty.

 

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To Cast or to Fabricate?

Posted by & filed under Craftsmanship.

One of the most important decisions a jeweler makes when creating a new piece is whether to cast or to fabricate. Both casting and fabrication have been used to make jewelry for thousands of years, so the decision about which method to use is based on several concerns including complexity of the design, intended use of the piece, and the size of the gemstone being set. But perhaps we should step back and review the two methods:

When you fabricate, you start with gold (or platinum or silver) in the form of ingots, sheet, or wire. Using hammers, torches, pliers, and other hand tools, you form it into bands for rings, backings for settings, bezels, prongs, baskets, and galleries.

Anatomy of a RingWhen you cast, the traditional method (which is still used widely today) begins by carving a model of the item you plan to make in wax. A more modern method is to design a computer model of the item using a CAD program, then create the model in plastic using a 3D growing device. Once the wax or plastic model has been created, it is encased in a plaster-like material called investment, and heated in a kiln to melt out the wax or plastic. What remains is a plaster model with an impression of the jewelry item inside where the wax or plastic used to be. Into that void you pour liquid metal, and once the metal has cooled and hardened, you break away the plaster to reveal the rough piece of jewelry.

Either method of jewelry making is a valid, artisanal process. So why do we choose to hand fabricate nearly everything we make at Omi Privé?

First, the soldered prongs of a hand-fabricated jewelry piece are stronger than the prongs of a cast piece. This is not to suggest well-cast prongs are likely to break — they aren’t.  But at Omi Privé we are setting the finest gemstones, so it is important to us that the prongs be able to stand the maximum quality test, and that means hand fabrication.

Second, many of our designs require delicate wire work. We use drawn or extruded gold or platinum wire, which is much stronger than cast metal.  Just one look at the galleries of our rings will show you the intricacies of our designs. Less skilled jewelers would choose to cast these pieces, because the hand work is extremely challenging. But true masters of jewelry making do this work by hand to achieve a more refined, more delicate, and longer-lasting piece than casting can produce.

At Omi Privé, we want to create more than beautiful jewelry. We want to create masterpieces. So our choice is almost always to fabricate, and only cast when casting is the superior choice. Because when you’re working with the most beautiful gemstones in the world, only the most masterful settings will do.