Pantone’s Spring Palette 2017

Posted by & filed under Aquamarine, Bridal, Color, Craftsmanship, Doré Collection, Duet Collection, Fancy Sapphire, Gem History, Gem Knowledge, Monaco Collection, News, Omi Privé, One-of-a-Kind Collection, Padparadscha Sapphire, Sapphire, Sevilla Collection, Signature Collection, Spessartite Garnet, Spinel, Tourmaline, Trends.

Accessorizing with the Colors of the Season

 

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The trend-setting institution that is Pantone shares with the world on an ongoing basis the most important fashion colors for Spring and Fall seasons.  What do you do with this information?  Do you immediately go out shopping, with palette in hand, to ensure you are on trend with your personal apparel?  Or do you give it a quick glance, pick out a couple of your favorites and file it away for future reference?  The important aspect from our perspective of this guide to the upcoming season’s colors is how do we recommend our jewelry as an accessory to outifts in these hues.

 

For example, let’s look at what we might suggest for Island Paradise, a light, refreshing blue color.  The obvious choice if you were the type of person who likes matching accessories, would be something with aquamarine as the featured gemstone.  The light, airy feel of aqua would pair beautifully with this color.  What about a complementary color?  We would suggest something with a pastel feel, such as a light pink or peach.  A piece featuring a light pink sapphire, spinel, morganite, or in this case a Padparadscha sapphire, would be a great match.

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If we look at the more “earthy” colors in this palette, aside from finding matching colors, we will also have the opportunity to select colors that really pop against a warmer base color.  If we look at the the color Greenery, which is also Pantone’s “Color of the Year” for 2017, we would match this color with gemstones such as peridot, chrysoberyl or green tourmaline, like this ring below.  On the other side of the spectrum, you would look to something in a bolder purple, red or pink as a suitable companion.  As you can see from this Duet ring, we love combining green with purple spinel centers.

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For another example, let’s consider a rich blue color like Lapis Blue.  One of our specialties is blue sapphire, so matching this color with existing Omi jewelry is relatively easy.  The complementary color for a bold blue color like this would be an equally bold orange hue – which we would find in our new orange tourmaline ring seen below.  We can also find similar colors in spessartite garnets and orange sapphires.

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There is a myriad of options when it comes to accessorizing this Spring’s fashion color palette with fabulous colored gemstones.  Knowing and understanding how colors accent each other will go a long way in developing your fashion credibility amongst your peers and clients.  Pay attention to what the trends are and take the time to pick out the best options for you to ensure you are trend-savvy in your day-to-day life.

 

 

Color in Bridal is Back Where it Belongs

Posted by & filed under Alexandrite, Aquamarine, Award Winning, Bridal, Color, Doré Collection, Fancy Sapphire, Gem History, Gem Knowledge, Kashmiri Sapphire, Omi Privé, Padparadscha Sapphire, Pink Sapphire, Sapphire, Trends.

Omi Privee ring with Kashmiri sapphire

There was a time in this great land, not too long ago, when a great behemoth of a company ruled the airwaves with a constant barrage of commercials stating that “A Diamond is Forever”. One would have been considered weird or rebellious to get engaged with anything other than a diamond. Well, things have changed here in the 21st century with a renaissance of color emerging in engagement rings. Women and men are choosing gemstones for their most important and symbolic piece of jewelry that better reflect them as individuals. It is a new age, free of any pressure or traditional bonds to choose fabulous color over the monotony of the colorless.

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Prior to the days of mass marketing’s influence on the population, colored gemstones were far more popular as a symbol of one’s love for another. In fact, sapphires were the gemstone of choice in early engagement rings, not only for their beauty, value and symbolism of love, but they were also believed to reveal any infidelity of the wearer. In the 18th and 19th century, colored gemstones were valued higher than diamonds, so it was more special for a bride to receive a rarer, more valuable colored gemstone than a more run-of-the-mill diamond.

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Today’s brides-to-be can choose from an incredible array of gemstones and hues. There are so many reasons that a person may connect with a particular type of gemstone. It could be as simple as a favorite color. It could be the origin of the gemstone. It could be a special cosmic trait that a gemstone posesses and creates a bond with the wearer. Whatever the reason, there is a universe of options available to the newly unshackled engagement ring shopper.

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There are some practical considerations that should come into the decision-making process when choosing a colored gemstone engagement ring. One of the most important factors is durability. You will wear your engagement ring for a long time, so it is imperative to select a gemstone that will stand up to the daily grind of life. Really durable gemstones include sapphires, rubies, chrysoberyl (alexandrite), topaz and spinel. Within this list, you will find every color in the rainbow to select from.  Your choices are endless and it is entirely up to the wearer as to which gemstone speaks to him or her.

 

 

Colored gemstones are returning as the symbol of love and romance as they have been throughout history.  The few decades-long blip on the radar of mass marketed colorless stones is being replaced by a new era of freedom of choice and personal expression.  We are honored and proud to be able to play a role in so many new special moments involving our beautiful colored gemstones and award-winning jewelry designs, and look forward to many more as color returns to its rightful place in the realm of romance.

 

 

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Sapphires – September’s Magnificent Birthstone

Posted by & filed under Award Winning, Bridal, Color, Fancy Sapphire, Omi Privé, One-of-a-Kind Collection, Sapphire.

Sapphire is one of the most revered gemstones in the world.  It has held special meaning from the most ancient of times when it was worn as a symbol of power, wealth and as protection from harm and witchcraft.  It is even said that the Ten Comandments were given to Moses on tablets of sapphire.  As sapphires made their way into more modern pieces of jewelry, their siginificance and value continued to rise.  Sapphires are found in the world’s most important royal jewelry pieces – so much so that sapphire is considered a “royal” gem. One royal-related piece that has garnered incredible attention in recent years is the blue sapphire engagement ring that Prince Charles gave to Diana, and subsequently that Prince William gave to Kate Middleton.

 

 

Sapphire is probably best known as a blue gemstone, but it is found in every color of the spectrum.  When a sapphire is red, it is called a ruby.  This wide palette of colors gives jewelry designers a lot of flexibility in creating colorful, all-sapphire designs.  Sapphires are an excellent gemstone to use in everyday jewelry because of its durability – as it is the second hardest gemstone behind only diamond.  A recent trend, maybe with help from Will and Kate, has seen many couples choosing sapphires for their engagement rings over diamonds – either in the traditional blue sapphire with a diamond halo, or in other colors as in the purple and pink sapphire ring below.  Sapphires durability makes it suitable for everyday wear.

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Would you say “Yes” to this engagement ring?

 

Sapphires are found in many countries around the world, including the United States.  Most of our sapphires come from Sri Lanka/Ceylon, Madagascar and Myanmar/Burma.  In most of these places sapphires are still mined by hand by artisanal miners in very remote areas.  We travel the globe to find sapphires that best meet our strict standards and our clients’ needs.  Fine sapphires are rare and prices have risen steadily for many years as demand continues to be very strong, which makes fine sapphire a nice long term investment.  There is nothing more fulfilling for us than sourcing a gorgeous sapphire, designing a beautiful jewelry piece around it, then having someone appreciate it enough to add it to their personal jewelry collection.

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Award-winning Omi Prive’ sapphire and diamond platinum bracelet

What’s Old is New Again: Colored Gemstone Wedding Jewelry

Posted by & filed under Bridal, Ruby, Sapphire.

Omi Privee ring with Kashmiri sapphireThough diamonds are currently the gem of choice in engagement rings, it was only in the 20th century that diamonds became popular. Before the 20th century, colored gemstones had a long history of being considered most precious.

Engagement rings as we know them began as a result of Pope Innocent III implementing a mandatory waiting period between engagement and marriage in the year 1215. Until that time, people simply married once they made the decision to do so. Couples in the limbo between not-married and married began to exchange symbols of commitment, and the engagement ring was born. Jump forward 150-200 years, and it was the sapphire that was the favorite engagement gemstone, because it symbolized love, truth and commitment. Plus, it was believed that a sapphire’s color would fade if worn by an unfaithful or untruthful person!

Royalty were known to use diamonds in their engagement rings, but no more often than they used sapphires, rubies and emeralds. And of course, back in those centuries diamonds were extremely rare. But starting in 1870, when huge diamond deposits were discovered in South Africa, diamonds began to flood the market and prices for diamonds started to come down. De Beers launched its massive effort in to make diamonds part of every wedding in 1938.  They coined the phrase “A Diamond is Forever” in 1947 and by the 1960s, diamonds were synonymous with engagement.  That slogan was named the best advertising slogan of the 20th century.

Today we see a resurgence of interest in colored gemstones for engagement rings. Today’s brides are open to a broad range of gemstones and designs, basing their jewelry decisions on personal taste, the desire for uniqueness, and concerns about diamond origins. Colored gemstones – many of which are rarer than diamonds – offer exciting stories for today’s brides; from historic lore to the metaphysical properties of gems and the various meanings associated with colors. It appears the old adage is true: What comes around goes around. At Omi Privé, we’re just excited that colored gemstone bridal jewelry has come around again.