The Olympic Rings: The Meaning Behind the Colors

Posted by & filed under Color, Gem History, Gem Knowledge, Omi Privé.

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While we are all in the throws of Olympic Fever (no, not the type you catch when swimming in Rio Bay!) – we thought it might be fun to explore the meaning behind the colors in the Olympic rings on the official flag.  We here at Omi Gems and Omi Privé are hyper-focused on color.

 

The multi-color interlocking rings symbol that we all associate with the Olympic Games was designed in 1912 by one of the co-founders of the modern Olympics, Baron Pierre de Coubertin.  His inspiration stemmed from the interlocking rings of Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung, who thought the ring symbolized continuity and the human being.

 

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The five rings symbolize the five populated continents at the time: Africa, America, Asia, Europe and Oceania.  The ring colors, contrary to belief at one point, are not assigned to specific continents. The colors (including white) represented all of the colors on all of the nation’s flags who competed in the Olypics at that time.  Coubertin shared the following in 1912:

“…the six colorscombined in this way reproduce the colors of every country without exception.  The blue and yellow of Sweden, the blue and white of Greece, the tri-colors of France and Serbia, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, America, Germany, Belgium, Italy, and Hungary, and the yellow and red of Spain, are placed together with the innovations of Brazil or Australia, with old Japan, and with new China.  Here is truly an international symbol.”  (Olympique magazine)

So, enjoy the rest of the Olympic Games and it’s symbolism.  We all can use a little dose of the Olympic ideal of bringing the world together to celebrate sport and life.

Spinel – August’s New Birthstone

Posted by & filed under Award Winning, Gem History, Gem Knowledge, Omi Privé, Spinel.

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For more than a century, August babies have had to embrace peridot and sardonyx (a reddish-brown quartz) as their official birthstones.  Peridot is a polarizing gemstone – many people like the yellow-green hued gem, but many do not.  But fashionable people born in the eighth month can rejoice in the streets as they now have a great additional option – the spectacular spinel.

 

The American Gem Trade Association and Jewelers of America recently announced their decision to add spinel to the official birthstone list for August.  This is only the third update to the list that was created in 1912.  The last addition took place in 2002, when tanzanite was added as a birthstone for December.

 

Spinel is a gemstone that deserves more exposure and recognition.  For centuries, red spinels were mistaken for rubies and it wasn’t until more modern testing techniques were developed that the difference was identified.  In fact, one of the most prominent “rubies”, the Black Prince Ruby in the Imperial State Crown in the British Crown Jewels, is actually a 170 carat red spinel.  While a deep, vivid red is the most valuable color of spinel, the gem naturally occurs in a spectrum of colors including pink, blue, purple, yellow, black and green hues.

 

Spinels are often called the “Gemologist’s Gemstone” because of their fabulous properties, including single refractivity and octahedral crystal structure.  Unlike many gemstones, spinels are almost never treated in any way to enhance their color or clarity.  Cutters are able to release the color and life of these natural gems by faceting the rough crystals into a multitude of shapes.

 

Omi Privé has featured spinels in many of its pieces over the years and will continue to do so in upcoming collections.  Niveet is passionate about sourcing beautiful spinels, then designing  jewelry around them with complementary colors.  Just recently, one of our finest spinel pieces was recognized with a prestigious AGTA Spectrum Award – which honors jewelry design, craftsmanship and gemstone quality.

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